The following pieces were created during 2010 and 2011, when I first decided to pursue artistic expression through painting. These were done in a gestation period when I was experimenting with a more contemporary style while using the mask as a reference point. A few were painted in 2012 when I first began working under the mentorship of my artist friend Bill Moll.

 

GuruAnimalPainting

 

The Guru

63" x 51", acrylic on medium weight canvas, curtain rod, 2011

 

This was one of the first large scale paintings I completed when I decided that I would become a "painter". I had already tried many things in life, and to be truthful, I had a long run as a mask maker and costume maker for theatrical productions, but this was different. I was in a new phase, a phase that would be more honest than anything artistic I had done in the past. I painted and repainted the piece for many days, as I was a bit green, and not sure if this new, abstract sort of thing was my gig. My brother-in-law, Roger Terreault, and my sister were staying with me in Florida at the time. Roger would sit and watch me paint, offering suggestions. Sometimes I would act upon his ideas and they were fruitful, but other times they were a failure, so I would have to paint them out. I consider this piece a joint effort between Roger and I. He went with me to gallery openings in the area, and I introduced him as "Roget, the Art Critic". It was great fun. I will miss Roger as he passed from this world in November, 2014.

 

 

 

MollyPainting

 

Molly

32" x 26", acrylic on canvas, curtain rod, 2011

 

Molly, the cat depicted in this painting, belonged to my sister-in-law Jill and my brother Tim. She was on the small side, very black, with golden-green eyes. Molly was shy and usually hid when visitors arrived at her home. She lived in rural Wisconsin, but was strictly a house-bound cat. In this painting Molly explores the great outdoors, if only through the window pane, and with the assistance of her great feline imagination.

 

 

 

Bats1Painting

 

Bats #2

24" x 18", mixed media on paper, 2012

 

This was the second painting I completed under the instruction of William Moll at the Oakton Community College in Skokie Illinois. He took umbrage with the empty circles in the piece because "my eyes get stuck on them". Later I would tease him about the famous works of Russian Artist Wassily Kandinsky 1866 - 1944 (featured below) and any other prominent artist who featured zeros or circles in their paintings. He had very specific directions for me, concerning Bats #2, telling me to use the light blue to accentuate the stars and the light yellow to outline the trees. I was intrigued. No one had ever told me how I could make my painting better in such explicit terms. As much to humor him as to try something new, I did as he instructed. As you can see, he was right. I think this mystical painting of a male ancestor floating above the trees, is a perfectly resolved piece of art, despite the white dots that pepper it.

 

 

Russian Artist Wassily Kandinsky 1866 - 1944

 

 

 

Bats2Painting

 

Bats #1

24" x 18", mixed media on paper, 2012

 

 This was the very first painting I completed under the instruction of William Moll. As mentioned, Bill hated the circles in the piece because "my eyes get stuck on them". However, when I finally mastered the precise way to achieve resolution in my paintings, he would chastise me about the tiny circle that dotted the "i" in my signature, "Atiq". He said that "my eyes get stuck on it". I had to laugh at this remark and complain that he could not find anything else wrong with the painting, so he had to critique my signature. With his gentle prodding, I would learn that my signature is every bit as important as the lines and strokes that formed the subject matter.

 

 

 

 

Bats #3

24" x 18", mixed media on paper, 2012

 

This is the third in a series of "bat" paintings, which are based on a set of black and white ball point pen drawings I created several years prior. I used the drawings in a novella I wrote posted on the "fiction" link of this site, here. Bats #3 was completed after taking a winter walk in my favorite Skokie refuge, Emily Oaks nature preserve. I was thinking about the return of the leaves in springtime.

 

 

 

HunterPainting

 

Hunter

30" x 22", mixed media on paper, 2010

 

 True to the theme in my early works, this piece resembles a ceramic mask I created in 2006 (pictured below). I was attempting to render the image of planets in space. The mask was to signify the solid iron core of the earth, with hands shaped like clusters of green grapes. Cone shaped evergreen trees project from the surface of the planet. The painting was composed in 2010, but after I dug it up in 2014, I tinkered with it to make it more appealing. It is not one of my favorites. I prefer the mask below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FireSnakePainting

 

Fire Snake

30" x 22", mixed media on paper, 2010

 

While living in Florida, I had many encounters with snakes, and I find them very beautiful creatures. My meetings were divided equally between venomous and non-venomous types. Here, on paper, I have captured a Rattlesnake. I tried to imagine the snake conjuring lightning and fire with its rattle and dance. The face of the snake is based on a mask I created years earlier (below).

 

 

 

 

 

WhipporwillPainting

 

Whipporwill

24" x 18", mixed media on paper, 2011

 

 

Whipporwill was one of the last pieces I completed before meeting with my mentor, Bill Moll. The mask theme is clearly apparent - as the nest and eggs in the center of the painting. Whipporwills make their nests on the forest floor and they are nocturnal birds, crying out their famous namesake in the dead of night. Growing up in a midwestern city, I had never heard the call of this bird, even when I camped with my family as a child. I heard it first in Florida as a graying adult, and yet, it was no less magical and awe- inspiring.

 

 

 

 

Bead Head

24" x 18", mixed media on paper, 2012

 

I like to think this painting symbolizes information coming into the head and then being spoken out. Bead Head is based on a set of black and white ball point pen drawings I created several years prior. I used the drawings in a novella posted on the "fiction" link of this site, here.

 

 

 

 

 

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